Second Coming--what if "Straight To The Man" and "Good Times" had been b-sides?

Stone Roses Discussion
rangers
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:22 pm

Re: Second Coming--what if "Straight To The Man" and "Good Times" had been b-sides?

Post by rangers » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:59 pm

Always thought this,
They could have put all dance/dub on one EP
Straight to man
Begging you
Ride on
Breakout

Maybe they were going for the one nation under a groove formula and trying cover all bases at once. Rather than one cohesive body of work

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Northern Guy
Posts: 70
Joined: Sun Jul 02, 2017 8:40 am

Re: Second Coming--what if "Straight To The Man" and "Good Times" had been b-sides?

Post by Northern Guy » Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:14 am

Something like this:

Single (c. October 1994):

A -- Breaking Into Heaven [edited down to about 5:00 for radio]
B -- Straight to the Man
C -- Breakout


Single (c. December 1994)

A -- Ten Storey Love Song
B -- Good Times

Album (c. January 1995)

A -- Breaking Into Heaven [edited down to about 7:00]
A -- Ten Storey Love Song
A -- Begging You [mixed better and edited down to about 3:20]
A -- Love Spreads
A -- Daybreak

B -- Ride On [cut 45 seconds or so off this]
B -- Your Star Will Shine
B -- Tightrope
B -- Tears
B -- How Do You Sleep


Single (c. April 1995)

A -- How Do You Sleep
B -- Driving South [mixed better]
C -- Good Times [1993 rehearsal]



So, the tracks I cut from the LP are 'Good Times', 'Driving South', and 'Straight to Man'. I don't dislike those songs (I really like 'Good Times' as a song), but they don't seem to fit the album... and the first two are easy targets for poor, or weird, lyrics. The c.1993 run though of 'Good Times' on bootleg is a way better song than the finished track, but I suppose that's a lost cause, so I ended up sticking the two versions on B-sides of singles. ('Driving South' is an okay song, but the way the Roses recorded it, and the way they played it live, both sounded bad.)

I really think they should have issued two strong singles (of contrasting styles) before the album, thereby building anticipation and then releasing the album in the new year (guaranteed UK #1 if not in the Christmas rush).

I think 'Breaking Into Heaven' (edited) makes a much better "comeback" single than 'Love Spreads' -- it has a much better melody and a better chorus, and would be slightly more 'radio-friendly', although that probably wasn't the priority at the time. Then, 'Ten Storey Love Song' is the obvious second one, and it would remind people of the something like the earlier Roses-sound.

I deliberated on whether 'Love Spreads' or 'How Do You Sleep' should be the third single. I go with 'How Do You Sleep'. It's a much more commercial song, and if they could have gotten a better mix (or a livelier performance from Ian) it was another certain top-10.


The way I cut and re-mixed and shuffled the album would have made for a generally better-received record, but let's not kid ourselves -- Second Coming was a half-assed album by a band coming apart, and in any configuration would not have been universally admired. But this way is better.

Regan 2.0
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 7:11 pm

Re: Second Coming--what if "Straight To The Man" and "Good Times" had been b-sides?

Post by Regan 2.0 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:27 pm

Northern Guy wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 5:14 am
Something like this:

Single (c. October 1994):

A -- Breaking Into Heaven [edited down to about 5:00 for radio]
B -- Straight to the Man
C -- Breakout


Single (c. December 1994)

A -- Ten Storey Love Song
B -- Good Times

Album (c. January 1995)

A -- Breaking Into Heaven [edited down to about 7:00]
A -- Ten Storey Love Song
A -- Begging You [mixed better and edited down to about 3:20]
A -- Love Spreads
A -- Daybreak

B -- Ride On [cut 45 seconds or so off this]
B -- Your Star Will Shine
B -- Tightrope
B -- Tears
B -- How Do You Sleep


Single (c. April 1995)

A -- How Do You Sleep
B -- Driving South [mixed better]
C -- Good Times [1993 rehearsal]



So, the tracks I cut from the LP are 'Good Times', 'Driving South', and 'Straight to Man'. I don't dislike those songs (I really like 'Good Times' as a song), but they don't seem to fit the album... and the first two are easy targets for poor, or weird, lyrics. The c.1993 run though of 'Good Times' on bootleg is a way better song than the finished track, but I suppose that's a lost cause, so I ended up sticking the two versions on B-sides of singles. ('Driving South' is an okay song, but the way the Roses recorded it, and the way they played it live, both sounded bad.)

I really think they should have issued two strong singles (of contrasting styles) before the album, thereby building anticipation and then releasing the album in the new year (guaranteed UK #1 if not in the Christmas rush).

I think 'Breaking Into Heaven' (edited) makes a much better "comeback" single than 'Love Spreads' -- it has a much better melody and a better chorus, and would be slightly more 'radio-friendly', although that probably wasn't the priority at the time. Then, 'Ten Storey Love Song' is the obvious second one, and it would remind people of the something like the earlier Roses-sound.

I deliberated on whether 'Love Spreads' or 'How Do You Sleep' should be the third single. I go with 'How Do You Sleep'. It's a much more commercial song, and if they could have gotten a better mix (or a livelier performance from Ian) it was another certain top-10.


The way I cut and re-mixed and shuffled the album would have made for a generally better-received record, but let's not kid ourselves -- Second Coming was a half-assed album by a band coming apart, and in any configuration would not have been universally admired. But this way is better.
What a load of codswallop.

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